Episode 21-Camp Cooking at the RTR

This video showcases that it is fun and possible to have good food and eat well as a nomad. Having a built-in, indoor kitchen and a refrigerator helps, but those aren’t a necessity.

In this video you also hear me joking that you don’t have to learn how to cook to eat well – implying that you can do what I do – and that is to be blessed enough to hang out with some great cooks. It is said tongue-in-cheek because of course it is better to know how to cook instead of relying on others.

I used to cook. I enjoyed cooking and would prepare elaborate meals from scratch – breakfast, dinners, holiday meals, the whole enchilada (so to speak). I had forgotten that. My sister reminded me of it last year. But with my brain injury, even if I am able to organize a meal, it has gotten to the point where it is no longer safe for me to cook. So I have made the agreement with those close to me that I will no longer cook inside with an open flame (i.e., a stove), and if I cook outside, I will only do so with someone else present. It is what it is, and I am grateful for the life I have. It’s a good one.

Because of the wonderful people in my life I am able to make coffee without an open flame. I use a 12V coffee maker. I also have a 12V RoadPro oven and a 12V crock pot. Did I mention how blessed I am? We will do a review of those and my fridge in an upcoming video.

I love my refrigerator, but I didn’t always have one. Prior to having a fridge, I had learned from my nomad friends that you can put a soft side cooler on the floor (soft sided fits easier) in front of the passenger or driver seat, whichever gets less sun. Keep it covered, put your cold items in there immediately after purchase, along with some fresh produce, and the items will keep for a few days. This is not a comprehensive list but here are a few things I used to keep in my cooler:

tortillas (keeps better than bread), 1/2 dozen eggs, block cheese, summer sausage, romaine lettuce, fresh tomatoes, fruits, and the like (pending room)

Supplement that with items like canned meats, canned veggies, soups, bacon jerky, parmesan cheese, spices, crackers, tiny containers of olives, guacamole, apple sauce, etc., and you can whip up some pretty good meals.

With a refrigerator, for even the most base cook, the sky is the limit. And somehow, camp cooking often seems to taste better than a meal prepared in stix&brix. Or, maybe, that’s just my taste buds. I don’t know. But it seems to me I eat better and have enjoyed more flavorful meals since being on the road (thanks to my friends) than I ever did at home.

Two Meander isn’t a cooking channel, but Robert is a FANTASTIC cook so we will from time to time cover this topic. And future videos and articles will vary in detail and information. Our goal is for you to have the confidence that you don’t have to sacrifice the quality of your meals while on the road.

Here are some examples. In each photo, I list who made it and what their rig is. We hope it triggers your imagination to eat well and enjoy camp cooking. Happy and yummy trails!

4 Replies to “Episode 21-Camp Cooking at the RTR”

  1. I am glad to see you can still eat well on the road. I have no doubt that Robert is a good cook.

    I enjoy reading the backstory on the videos you two create. Robert is correct that you write well Debra.


  2. Thanks for your suggestions on items that a person can carry short term without refrigeration. I have had to cook since my last brain injury, but having my sense of smell and taste destroyed by my last TBI, I no longer can taste most foods. So if I want to make something for somebody, the thing I do is bake. That way you have a written recipe to follow and are able to repeat it over and over again. Great to read your blogs and watch your videos. Hope to make a week trip to see what it is like this spring. Then maybe full time for a while next year. Have to wait and see how things turn out. Have a great day.

    1. Thank you so much for sharing this Jeff. KOKO! We do what we have to do to assess, adapt and modify (a term given to me by a friend). Sounds like you are doing that beautifully. Happy and safe trails to you! Thanks for being here.

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